CULT CALENDAR 2/6/15

WHAT'S UP IN NEW york CITY ART & FASHION 

CULT EDITOR'S MUST-SEE EXHIBITS TO CATCH THIS WEEK

Yves Saint Laurent + Halston: Fashioning the ’70s EXHIBIT

FEB 6th - APR 18th at the MUSEUM @ FIT, 227 West 27th Street, New York, NY 10001

celebrates the two designers who defined the sexy and glamorous fashions of the 1970s. This is the first exhibition to juxtapose their work and analyze the way they dealt with similar themes and aesthetics during the heigh of their careers. Both designers are equally represented by the approximately 80 ensembles and 20 accessories that are arranged thematically in an environment designed to evoke the style of this singular, dynamic era in history.

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 ALEJANDRO VIGILANTE: iPOP SOCIAL COMMENTARY

ONGOING at Avant Gallery, 143 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 100016

The founder of what he calls “the i-Pop movement”, Alejandro Vigilante creates humorous and ironic mixed-media works and paintings that draw their subject matter from popular culture. In his “WiFi in the afterlife” series, Vigilante gives voice to iconic figures such as Grace Kelly, Frida Kahlo, and Marilyn Monroe, transferring images of them onto wood, alongside imagined Tweets and social media updates that the figures might have sent in today’s networked culture, and colorful patterns in acrylic paint. “What’s more pop than the internet?” he has asked. Vigilante cites Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg as major influences on his work.

KILLER HEELS: THE ART OF THE HIGH-HEELED SHOE

Now through MAR 1st at the Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, NY, 11238

Killer Heels explores fashion's most provocative accessory. From the high platform chopines of sixteenth century Italy to the glamorous stilettos of today's runways and red carpets, the exhibition looks at the high-heeled shoe's rich and varied history and its enduring place in our popular imagination. 

DAVID LYLE: EVERYONE'S A CRITIC

FEB 12th - MAR 14th at Lyons Wier Gallery, 542 West 24th Street, New York, NY 10011

Working from found vintage and vernacular photographs, Lyle seamlessly composes works that harken back to 1950's and 1960's America - not as they were, but skewed and reimagined by the artist. In Everyone's A Critic, Lyle is impeccably faithful to the vintage photographs that inspire his work -- until a point, in which he instills a cultural reference so familiar, yet iconoclastic, as to leave the viewer wincing, laughing, or really thinking -- often it is all three.